YOU CAN DO IT!

Study Motivation
Hello! I'm Emily, and I'm a student currently in my final years of schooling. Here is a blog dedicated to study tips, tricks, motivation and advice!

Find what you need in my links and feel free to ask me anything study related!

* answered asks *

(a.k.a. khaleeesii)

studylikeadoctor:

HOW TO ORGANIZE YOUR STUDYING SCHEDULE: 

Hey guys!! Since some of you asked me how I organized my studying schedule for this summer, I thought it would be best to make a post about it. It’s the first time I make a post such as this, and I’m sorry for the poor quality of my photos, but my mobile phone has the only camera I have at hand, so let’s get down to business! 

  1. KNOW YOUR DEADLINES: It’s important to know when do you have your exams, when is that essay due and so on. This way you’ll keep track of time and you’ll know how much time you need to commit to each task. I would advise color coding each one, as I did with the subjects which exams I have to retake in september. This way, you’ll have your goals and needs always in mind. 
  2. KNOW WHAT YOU NEED TO STUDY: It’s important to be sure of all the things you need to study. As you can see in this image, I wrote down every unit I need to know for my anatomy exam, and I did the same for the other subjects as well. I also added a little checkbox beside each unit in order to keep track of all the times I revise each one so I can know at a glance how I’m doing and where I need to improve. 
  3. USE ADDITIONAL TOOLS: Getrevising is a webpage that can help you create a schedule if you don’t know where to start. It gives you the opportunity to, completely free, add your classes, appointments, subjects and deadlines to create a schedule. You can also give a priority to each subject so they can assign more study hours to those subjects you find more difficult or where you need to invest more time. I used it as a reference, because it is not perfect, and I don’t know if it’s possible to change the study blocks from 1 hour sessions to longer or shorter ones, but it helps you to make an idea of how many hours you should invest in each subject. Anyway, this tool is completely unnecessary, but I used it because my study schedule is for the whole summer (that’ll be two months of holidays) and so I felt a bit overwhelmed by how many things I needed to tackle. 
  4. EDIT AND WRITE YOUR OWN SCHEDULE ATTENDING TO YOUR NEEDS: The most important thing when you write your study schedule is to know your strengths and limits. I printed a weekly schedule from my laptop iCal to see at a simple glance how many things I had going on in a week and how many hours I could dedicate to study. You can find simple weekly calendars anyway or you can even make your own. The first thing I wrote down were all those unavoidable things such as birthday parties and weddings and medical appointments as well as those things I want to do daily such as running, bathing, walking the dog or reading a bit at night. Once this is done, I can see how many free hours for studying I have, and if I feel like they are not enough, I cut down some things that aren’t completely necessary, because sometimes what is necessary is to make some sacrifices. But remember to always leave some free time for yourself, because it’s good for you to relax and get some strength back. Then, looking at your get revising schedule or simply knowing your needs, write down every day which units you are going to study. Try to be realistic, and don’t cram things in every study session. If you can only study tree units in one morning, then do that. Otherwise you’ll feel stressed and you won’t keep up with your schedule, which can make you feel bad and think that it’s not being useful at all. I’d also recommend highlighting your subjects with the same colors you used for your deadlines calendar, because it’ll help you make an idea in your head of your week. 
  5. TRANSFORM YOUR DAILY SCHEDULE INTO A DAILY ONE: I find it better to, once a daily schedule is prepared, write it down as a daily own, to the hour. Some people may think this is a bit obsessive, but it makes me less stressed knowing what I should be doing in every study session. Moreover, it makes me feel satisfied crossing out things I have already done, and crossing them out of my list! If you’ll feel stressed watching the things you have to do every hour using just the weekly schedule may be fine for you. I used a simple lined notebook and wrote the hours myself. 
  6. PLUS:KEEP TRACK OF YOUR PROGRESS: If you don’t want to make a daily schedule, or if you’re not accustomed to follow a schedule this thick, you may find useful keeping track of your progress. You can write down what you do every hour your dedicating to studying, or maybe you can write down things as “I planned to study for 3 hours with two 10 minutes breaks and I managed to study just 2 units when I planned to study 3”. This may help you know your weaknesses and analyze what you’re doing right and what you’re doing wrong. When you realized things as this, you’ll find easier to make a reliable and realistic schedule that is up to your needs and strong points. This way you’ll know if you work better in the mornings or the afternoons, if you get distracted easily… But remember that the most important thing is to take things easily and bit by bit. Everyone works differently, and what may work for others may not work for you. Analyze and know yourself, and then no one or anything will stop you. 

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I hope you found this helpful. I know this is just my method, but some of you were curious about it and I find inspiring knowing about other people’s methods. This way you can find your inspiration to work out your own methods and habits, and you’l feel much less frustrated when you manage to achieve your goals, but take your time and be patient. Succeed will take your hand if you work hard a bit everyday!!!! 

doingitformyself:

amymariestad:

because the wind is gonna blow no matter what.

This

“Please don’t just sit there like a vacant little catastrophe if you don’t understand this.”

- Calculus professor (via mathprofessorquotes)

study-hack:

Two very simple and quick things you can do during a stress to ease the stress and help with test anxiety.

“Most people fail at whatever they attempt because of an undecided heart. Should I? Should I not? Go forward? Go back? Success requires the emotional balance of a committed heart. When confronted with a challenge, the committed heart will search for a solution. The undecided heart searches for an escape. A committed heart does not wait for conditions to be exactly right.”

- Andy Andrews (via studentsoup)
How I plan to Study

study-hack:

image

My freshman year of college didn’t go too well for several reasons.

One, I had no idea what I was getting into: how the classes go, how to prepare for them, how to set a schedule, etc.

Two, I didn’t know how to study. I tried so many different things, different techniques, took notes in various ways, made flashcards.

But it turned out that jumping around like that only made it worse. Without having a steady, set way to prepare for each class, I couldn’t remember the information very well and ended up not doing too hot on the tests.

So now I want to actually set some goals for myself. Maybe these will be helpful to you guys too!

1) In class:

  • Always take notes, using 1 method: Cornell, Mapping, or Outline (on paper or on an iPad)
  • Listen actively, connect new information to something I’ve already heard or know
  • No mindless writing: take notes in my own words. This keeps your mind working during the lecture.

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